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英語で基礎英語 ご意見・ご要望大募集! 番組を聴いてあなたの感想を教えて下さい!

放送予定(全5回)

ラジオ第2
8月12日(月)~16日(金) 午前6:45〜7:00
午後0:25〜0:40 (再放送)
午後9:45〜10:00 (再放送)
8月18日(日) 午後4:30〜5:45 (再放送・5回分)

番組概要

この番組は、「英語で英語を学ぶ」ことを通して、「英語を話すための力を身につける」ための1週間限定のプログラムです。

 単語や文法には主眼をおかず、基本的な文法学習を終えた高校生、大学生、そして社会人の皆さまが、話したい内容を効果的に英語で伝えるコツをつかむことを目的としています。そのため、番組内で話されている英語に関しては、文法的な誤りが含まれているか所もあります。ただ、講師の先生、ネイティブとも相談し、コミュニケーション上問題がない、と判断したものは、そのまま放送しています。1週間を通して扱うテーマは、「バレンタインデーの義理チョコは必要かどうか」です。

 番組では、高校生や外国人旅行者の意見、バレンタインデーの歴史なども紹介しながら、義理チョコに関する意見をきいていきます。ぜひリスナーの皆さんも自分ならどちらの意見に賛成するかを考えながら番組をきいてみてください。
 そして、番組を聴いてくださった方は、ぜひ感想や要望を我々までお寄せください。新しい英語番組のあり方を、皆さまと一緒に考えていくことができれば幸いです。

番組を聴く(スクリプトを見る)

DAY 1のスクリプト

Momose

Hello, everyone. Welcome to the world of English. This is a special program that is aimed at learners who want to talk more in English. I'm Miho Momose. I'll be assisting you in expressing your thoughts in English.

Dario

Hi, I'm Dario Toda. It's great to be here.

Kellie

Hi, I'm Kellie Holway. It is my pleasure to be here and to support you.

Dario

And we'd like to introduce you to…

Shintaro

Hi, my name is Shintaro Terashima. I'm going to learn English on this program.

Momose

Shintaro will be our challenger. Shintaro, are you ready?

Shintaro

Yes, I am.

Momose

OK. Before we start, let's tell everyone about this program.

Dario

Sure. This program is a discussion-style program. It will run for five days. Kellie and I have different opinions on a topic. Each of us will try to persuade Shintaro by giving presentations.

Shintaro

Um... persuade?

Kellie

Let me explain. "Persuade" means "to make someone agree by giving them good reasons for something."

Shintaro

Oh. Thank you.

Momose

So, on the last day of the show, Shintaro, you are going to decide who you agree with. Like, "Dario's the winner!" or "I agree with Kellie." Got it, Shintaro?

Shintaro

Yes!

Kellie

Oh, I'm not going to lose.

Dario

What? I'm sure that Shintaro will be on my side.

Momose

OK, OK. So what's the topic?

Kellie

The topic is about an event in February. Let's listen to a dialogue first. In this dialogue, two people are talking. Mika is a high school student. She is talking with her father in the kitchen.

スクリプトをすべて見る

Father

Mika, what are you doing?

Mika

Oh, Dad, I'm making chocolates. Tomorrow is Valentine's Day!

Father

Ah, chocolates! Are you going to give them to a boy you like?

Mika

Uh... yes. Valentine's Day is a special day. A girl can tell a boy that she likes him by giving him chocolates.

Father

That's true in Japan.

Mika

In Japan? What do you mean?

Father

In most countries, couples usually give presents and cards to each other.

Mika

To each other?

Father

Yes. Boys give presents to girls, too.

Mika

Really?

Father

Some people might give flowers, jewelry, and candy, too. So who are you going to give the chocolates to?

Mika

That's a secret, Dad. I'm also making chocolates for everyone in my music club.

Father

All the members in your club? Did you know that only a few countries have a giri choco custom?

Mika

I didn't know that! Well, I think giri choco is a nice custom.

Father

Why?

Mika

You can tell people "thank you" by giving them chocolates. Also, it's a fun way to celebrate Valentine's Day.

Father

I understand. But in my opinion, giri choco is not necessary. Valentine's Day should be a day for people in love.

Mika

Hmm, I see. I was going to give chocolates to you, too, Dad. But I'll just give them all to the boy I like!

Father

What?! No!

Kellie

Oh. I think that's really nice that Mika was making chocolates for everyone in her music club.

Dario

Hmm, true. But I agree with the father pretty much.

Kellie

Really?

Dario

Mm-hmm.

Momose

OK. Now let's go over the main idea of this dialogue. Shintaro, I'm going to ask you some questions. Here is the first question. What is the topic of the dialogue? What is the topic of the dialogue?

Shintaro

Um... Valentine's Day.

Momose

Yes. The topic is Valentine's Day. All right, let's move on. Here is the second question. Mika and her father are talking about a special chocolate in Japan. Mika and her father are talking about a special chocolate in Japan. Can you tell me what that is?

Shintaro

Um... giri choco.

Dario

That's right. They are talking about giri choco.

Momose

Great! So what does Mika think about giri choco?

Shintaro

Um... she thinks giri choco is a nice custom.

Momose

Mm, that's good! Is that right, Kellie?

Kellie

That's right. She thinks it's a nice custom.

Momose

OK, let's listen to that part of the dialogue.

(Mika)

Well, I think giri choco is a nice custom.
Well, I think giri choco is a nice custom.

Momose

So, Shintaro, is she for giri choco?

Shintaro

For? What does it mean?

Kellie

If Mika is for giri choco, that means she agrees or supports the idea.

Shintaro

Oh, I got it.

Momose

So is she for giri choco?

Shintaro

Yes, she is.

Momose

Then, can you tell me why Mika is for giri choco?

Shintaro

Um... because Mika thinks giri choco is a nice chance to tell "thank you" to the boys.

Momose

Wow! Your answer is very good. Let's check that part.

(Mika)

You can tell people "thank you" by giving them chocolates.
You can tell people "thank you" by giving them chocolates.

Momose

Next, what does Mika's father think about giri choco?

Shintaro

Her father thinks that giri choco is not good.

Dario

Hmm, very close. He thinks it's not necessary.

Momose

OK, let's listen to that part.

(Father)

But in my opinion, giri choco is not necessary.
But in my opinion, giri choco is not necessary.

Dario

So he's against giri choco. "Against" means the opposite of "for."

Shintaro

Oh, OK, OK. He is against giri choco.

Momose

OK. Can you tell me why he is against giri choco?

Shintaro

Oh, OK. Because her father thinks that Valentine's Day is for man and woman in love. So giri choco is not love.

Momose

Good, good. That's good. So let's listen to that part.

(Father)

Valentine's Day should be a day for people in love.
Valentine's Day should be a day for people in love.

Shintaro

People in love?

Dario

People in love. For example, a girlfriend and a boyfriend. They are in love. So you can call them "people in love."

Shintaro

OK, OK.

Momose

Now we know why Mika is for giri choco and her father is against it. Then, let's look at the other parts of the dialogue. First, listen to this.

(Father)

In most countries, couples usually give presents and cards to each other.

(Mika)

To each other?

(Father)

Yes. Boys give presents to girls, too.

(Mika)

Really?

(Father)

Some people might give flowers, jewelry, and candy, too.

Momose

Kellie and Dario, what are your thoughts about this?

Kellie

It's true. In America, where I'm from, couples usually celebrate by going to a nice restaurant and exchanging gifts.

Dario

Well, I feel that, in Japan, giving chocolates is the main event. Valentine's Day is almost like a chocolate festival.

Kellie

I agree. In America, chocolate is only one part of Valentine's Day. The main event is spending time with your loved one.

Momose

Ah. So spending time with the person you love is the most important thing to do on Valentine's Day.

Kellie

That's right.

Momose

Very interesting. Now let's look at the last part of the dialogue. So, Shintaro, will Mika give chocolates to her father?

Shintaro

Um... no, she will not.

Momose

OK. Why?

Shintaro

Because her father said that Valentine's Day is for people in love. So, um, to Mika, father is not people in love. So she will not give chocolate to him.

Momose

OK. It's a challenging question, but you tried very hard.

Shintaro

Thank you.

Momose

Dario?

Dario

Well, Mika's father said that Valentine's Day is a day for people in love, so she decided to give all her chocolates to the boy she likes.

Shintaro

OK, I got it.

Momose

OK. Now let's listen to the dialogue again. This time, it will be a little faster.

Father

Mika, what are you doing?

Mika

Oh, Dad, I'm making chocolates. Tomorrow is Valentine's Day!

Father

Ah, chocolates! Are you going to give them to a boy you like?

Mika

Uh... yes. Valentine's Day is a special day. A girl can tell a boy that she likes him by giving him chocolates.

Father

That's true in Japan.

Mika

In Japan? What do you mean?

Father

In most countries, couples usually give presents and cards to each other.

Mika

To each other?

Father

Yes. Boys give presents to girls, too.

Mika

Really?

Father

Some people might give flowers, jewelry, and candy, too. So who are you going to give the chocolates to?

Mika

That's a secret, Dad. I'm also making chocolates for everyone in my music club.

Father

All the members in your club? Did you know that only a few countries have a giri choco custom?

Mika

I didn't know that! Well, I think giri choco is a nice custom.

Father

Why?

Mika

You can tell people "thank you" by giving them chocolates. Also, it's a fun way to celebrate Valentine's Day.

Father

I understand. But in my opinion, giri choco is not necessary. Valentine's Day should be a day for people in love.

Mika

Hmm, I see. I was going to give chocolates to you, too, Dad. But I'll just give them all to the boy I like!

Father

What?! No!

Momose

So did you enjoy today's lesson?

Shintaro

Yes, I did!

Momose

I'm glad to hear that.

Dario

By the way, Shintaro, have you ever gotten giri choco?

Shintaro

Me? Yes, I have.

Kellie

Wow! Well, what do you think about giri choco? Do you think it's good or bad?

Shintaro

I think it's good.

Kellie

Oh, me too! I'm glad we agree.

Dario

Oh, well, I don't agree with that at all. And, Shintaro, you're going to change your mind.

Kellie

What?

Momose

So tell me, Kellie and Dario. What are your positions on giri choco?

Kellie

Well, I agree with giri choco.

Dario

And I disagree with giri choco. I want to show that many people are on my side. We should listen to more people's opinions.

Kellie

Good idea. Let's listen to the opinions of high school students and tourists in Tokyo.

Momose

Great. We will do that tomorrow.

Kellie

I'm looking forward to it.

Dario

So don't forget to tune in tomorrow for Day 2!

All

Bye!

DAY 2のスクリプト

Dario

Welcome back to "Learn English in English"! This is a special program to help you become a better English speaker. I'm Dario Toda.

Kellie

And I'm Kellie Holway.

Momose

Hi, everyone. I'm Miho Momose. This program is in English. But don't worry. We will be here to support you.

Shintaro

Hi, I'm Shintaro Terashima. Let's enjoy English!

Momose

Today is the second day of this program. The goal of this program is for Kellie and Dario to persuade Shintaro to agree with their opinions. Shintaro, what's the topic?

Shintaro

Valentine's Day and giri choco.

Momose

Good. The topic is Valentine's Day and giri choco. Let's start by listening to the dialogue. Listen carefully to what Mika and her father are saying about giri choco.

スクリプトをすべて見る

Father

Mika, what are you doing?

Mika

Oh, Dad, I'm making chocolates. Tomorrow is Valentine's Day!

Father

Ah, chocolates! Are you going to give them to a boy you like?

Mika

Uh... yes. Valentine's Day is a special day. A girl can tell a boy that she likes him by giving him chocolates.

Father

That's true in Japan.

Mika

In Japan? What do you mean?

Father

In most countries, couples usually give presents and cards to each other.

Mika

To each other?

Father

Yes. Boys give presents to girls, too.

Mika

Really?

Father

Some people might give flowers, jewelry, and candy, too. So who are you going to give the chocolates to?

Mika

That's a secret, Dad. I'm also making chocolates for everyone in my music club.

Father

All the members in your club? Did you know that only a few countries have a giri choco custom?

Mika

I didn't know that! Well, I think giri choco is a nice custom.

Father

Why?

Mika

You can tell people "thank you" by giving them chocolates. Also, it's a fun way to celebrate Valentine's Day.

Father

I understand. But in my opinion, giri choco is not necessary. Valentine's Day should be a day for people in love.

Mika

Hmm, I see. I was going to give chocolates to you, too, Dad. But I'll just give them all to the boy I like!

Father

What?! No!

Momose

OK, let's quickly go over the dialogue.

Kellie

Sure. Mika thinks giri choco is a good custom because you can say "thank you" to many people.

Dario

So Mika is for giri choco.

Kellie

On the other hand, her father thinks that giri choco is not necessary because Valentine's Day is a day for people in love.

Dario

So Mika's father is against giri choco.

Momose

Now let's find out what other people think about giri choco.

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

We interviewed students from Chuo University High School. Let's listen to their opinions. The first student is for giri choco.

(Girl)

I think giri choco is good because girls enjoy making chocolates or buying chocolates and boys never feel bad when they got chocolates from girls. So I think that is good.

Kellie

She said, "I think giri choco is good because girls enjoy making chocolates or buying chocolates and boys never feel bad when they get chocolates from girls."

Momose

Thank you, Kellie. What do you think of this?

Kellie

I agree that most people like chocolates.

Momose

Me too! Here's the next one. This time, it's a boy's opinion.

(Boy)

I think giri choco is good. It's because making chocolates is fun. I think it is important whether all people enjoy Valentine's Day.

Dario

He said, "I think giri choco is good because making chocolates is fun. I think it is important for all people to enjoy Valentine's Day."

Momose

Thank you, Dario. What do you think of this?

Dario

This boy must be really good at making chocolates!

Momose

He must be! So, Shintaro, is he for or against giri choco?

Shintaro

He is for giri choco.

Momose

That's right. He is for giri choco because making chocolates is fun and everyone can enjoy Valentine's Day. Now let's listen to the next person.

(Girl)

I'm not good at making sweets, making chocolates. And some people are good at making chocolates. So I feel pressure.

Kellie

She said, "I'm not good at making sweets or making chocolates. And some people are good at making chocolates. So I feel pressure."

Momose

Thank you, Kellie. So, Shintaro, is she for or against giri choco?

Shintaro

She is against giri choco.

Momose

Good. She's against giri choco because she's not good at making sweets and chocolates. She says she feels pressure. OK, moving on. Here is the next student. She gives two reasons to support her opinion. Let's listen.

(Girl)

I think giri choco is bad because it costs me to buy an ingredient or wrapping. And Valentine's Day is the test period, so we are busy.

Dario

She said, "I think giri choco is bad because it costs me to buy ingredients and wrapping. And Valentine's Day is during the test period, so we are busy."

Shintaro

Excuse me. I can't understand... ingredient?

Dario

Oh, "ingredient." An ingredient is something you use to make something. For example, you can put nuts or milk in chocolates. So nuts and milk are ingredients.

Shintaro

Oh. OK, OK.

Momose

So, Shintaro, is she for or against giri choco?

Shintaro

She is against giri choco.

Momose

That's right. What are her two reasons?

Shintaro

Because giri choco costs to her and making chocolates has to use long time, so she can't study hard.

Momose

That's right. She's against giri choco because it costs money and she is busy with tests on Valentine's Day.

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

So that's it for the high school students.

Dario

Next, we'll listen to what other people think about giri choco. We interviewed some tourists visiting Japan. Let's hear their opinions about giri choco.

Kellie

We'll start with the people who are for giri choco.

(Woman)

It's a nice way to show someone that you care for them. It's just a way of saying, "Thank you for your friendship or companionship."

Momose

Kellie, can you rephrase that for us?

Kellie

Sure. First, she said that giri choco is a nice way to show someone that you are thinking about them. She also said that giri choco is a way of saying, "Thank you for your friendship or companionship."

Momose

Can you explain what companionship means?

Kellie

Sure. Companionship is the feeling of not being alone. It's similar to friendship.

Momose

Thank you. So what do you think about this?

Kellie

I like what she says and agree with her.

Momose

Yes, me too. Now let's listen to it one more time.

(Woman)

It's a nice way to show someone that you care for them. It's just a way of saying, "Thank you for your friendship or companionship."

Kellie

Here's the next one. We asked a young man how he would feel if he received giri choco. Listen.

(Man)

Good, delighted, thankful. I'd want to do something back.

Kellie

He said, "Good, delighted, thankful. I'd want to do something back."

Momose

What does "delighted" mean, Kellie?

Kellie

"Delighted" means "feeling very happy." He also said, "I'd want to do something back."

Momose

What does he mean by that?

Kellie

"To do something back" means "doing something nice to thank that person for giving him chocolates."

Momose

Hmm. OK, now let's listen to it again.

(Man)

Good, delighted, thankful. I'd want to do something back.

Dario

OK. Now let's listen to people who are against giri choco. First, we interviewed a tourist from the UK.

(Woman)

A big no-no. I think if you went and gave some men some chocolates in the UK, it would be seen completely different and taken the wrong way as well.

Dario

It was very fast. But don't worry. I'll repeat it. She said, "A big no-no."

Momose

What's "a big no-no"?

Dario

"A big no-no" means "a bad idea." She said, "I think if you went and gave men some chocolates in the UK, it would be seen completely different and taken the wrong way as well."

Momose

She says, "taken the wrong way." What does this mean?

Dario

This means that the man receiving the chocolates might think that this woman likes him, because in the UK, Valentine's Day is a day for couples.

Momose

So what do you think about this?

Dario

Well, I certainly agree. If a girl gives out giri choco in the UK, she might have a lot of boyfriends.

Momose

Thank you. Let's listen to it one more time.

(Woman)

A big no-no. I think if you went and gave some men some chocolates in the UK, it would be seen completely different and taken the wrong way as well.

Dario

OK. Here is the last one. Let's listen.

(Man)

If I was a girl, I wouldn't want to have to do that, like, forced to do that.

Dario

I'll repeat that. "If I was a girl, I wouldn't want to have to do that, like, forced to do that." He said that he wouldn't want to be forced to give giri choco.

Momose

Thank you. Now let's listen to it one more time.

(Man)

If I was a girl, I wouldn't want to have to do that, like, forced to do that.

Kellie

So a lot of the people that we interviewed were really surprised to hear about the custom of giri choco. But many people thought that it was a nice custom.

Dario

And on the other hand, some people thought it was quite confusing because Valentine's Day is a day for love in many countries.

Momose

Thank you, Kellie and Dario.

Momose

So, Shintaro, do you think the opinions we heard today changed your mind?

Shintaro

Uh... no, I don't.

Kellie

Oh, good! I'm glad you're still on my side.

Dario

Are you on her side? I think he's on my side.

Kellie

Well, now I think we should give our presentations.

Dario

Let's do that!

Momose

OK, I look forward to hearing your presentations starting tomorrow. That's all for today!

All

Bye!

DAY 3のスクリプト

Dario

Hi, I'm Dario. Welcome back to "Learn English in English"!

Kellie

And I'm Kellie. Today is Day 3 of this program. Let's get started.

Shintaro

Hi, I'm Shintaro Terashima. I'll do my best today.

Momose

And I'm Miho Momose. I'm here to support you. So we've been talking about giri choco on Valentine's Day.

Dario

That's right. And as I've been saying all along, I'm against it. I think giri choco is not necessary.

Kellie

Well, I am for giri choco. I like Japanese Valentine's Day because it's unique.

Momose

OK. I know Kellie is for giri choco and Dario is against it. Shintaro, what is your opinion?

Shintaro

I'm for giri choco.

Momose

So right now, Shintaro is for giri choco.

Kellie

So, Shintaro, why are you for giri choco?

Shintaro

Because giri choco is great custom. I can get chocolates free, so I like giri choco.

Momose

Right now, Shintaro is for giri choco.

Dario

OK. I will persuade him. I will make him agree with me. Yeah.

Kellie

No, no. He's already on my side. And I have some data to support my opinion.

Momose

Data. Please share it with us.

Kellie

OK. So this data is from a survey taken in 2017. 450 women were asked questions. 39.8 percent of them said that they were going to hand out giri choco.

Dario

Why do they do that?

スクリプトをすべて見る

Kellie

Good question! The number one reason was to show their gratitude.

Momose

Dario, "gratitude"?

Dario

"Gratitude" means "thank you" or "the feeling of thank you."

Shintaro

Oh, OK.

Momose

You got it?

Shintaro

Yes!

Momose

OK. Then, let's go on.

Kellie

OK. So about 60 percent of the women wanted to say "thank you" by giving their colleagues giri choco.

Momose

What was the second reason?

Kellie

It was that giri choco is good for better communication in the workplace. 44.7 percent of the women chose this answer.

Momose

Mm. So nearly 50 percent of the women think giri choco is good for communication. Thank you, Kellie, for sharing this information.

Kellie

No problem. Now I'm ready to give my presentation.

Momose

Shintaro and Dario, are you ready to listen?

Shintaro

Yes.

Dario

Yes, I am.

Momose

OK, Kellie, please let us know what you think about giri choco.

Kellie

Sure.

Kellie

Japanese Valentine's Day is unique. It's celebrated in an unusual way. I think it's good that Japan celebrates Valentine's Day in a different way than other countries. And there are two reasons why I think so.
First of all, it's an opportunity for women to express their love to men. This concept originated in Japan. And pretty much everyone in Japan knows how Valentine's Day works. It's a part of Japanese culture.
Second, Japanese Valentine's Day is meaningful. Giving chocolates is an expression of gratitude. In one survey in 2017, 450 women were asked if they were planning to hand out giri choco at their workplace. About 40 percent of them said yes. And among them, about 60 percent said it was a way of expressing their thanks to their coworkers. So there are a lot of women who think that giri choco can be a positive thing.
In conclusion, Valentine's Day in Japan is unique and meaningful. And giri choco is an important part of it. There is nothing wrong with the way Japanese people celebrate Valentine's Day. It's a wonderful Japanese tradition.

Momose

Thank you, Kellie. How was it, Shintaro?

Shintaro

It was a little bit... a little bit difficult.

Momose

OK. But don't worry. Let me ask you some questions about Kellie's presentation.

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

First, how many reasons did she have?

Shintaro

Um... two reasons.

Momose

Great. She gave two reasons to support her opinion. First, she said celebrating in the Japanese way is good. Kellie, can you tell us what you said about Japanese Valentine's Day?

Kellie

Sure. I said, "It's an opportunity for women to express their love to men. This concept originated in Japan. And pretty much everyone in Japan knows how Valentine's Day works. It's a part of Japanese culture." In other words, Japanese Valentine's Day is a chance for women to say "I like you." This idea was made in Japan. And almost all Japanese people understand it. It's already in Japanese culture.

Momose

Thank you, Kellie. OK? This was the first reason. OK?

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

Shintaro, do you remember the second reason?

Shintaro

Uh... I'm sorry. I don't remember.

Momose

OK, don't worry, don't worry. Kellie, can you say that again?

Kellie

Sure. "Second, Japanese Valentine's Day is meaningful. Giving chocolates is an expression of gratitude." I'll say that again. "Second, Japanese Valentine's Day is meaningful. Giving chocolates is an expression of gratitude."

Momose

Shintaro, what did she say?

Shintaro

She said, "Japanese Valentine's Day is meaningful."

Kellie

That's right!

Dario

"Meaningful" means it has meaning. So Kellie said that Japanese Valentine's Day has a purpose. This means there's a good reason for people to give chocolates on Valentine's Day.

Shintaro

Hmm, OK.

Momose

OK, thank you, Dario. Thank you, Shintaro. Kellie says that giri choco shows the feeling of "thank you." So, Shintaro, what do you think about this? Do you agree that giri choco expresses "thank you"?

Shintaro

Um... I agree with it.

Kellie

Great!

Momose

OK. So this is the way Valentine's Day is celebrated in Japan. In your conclusion, Kellie, you put in all your ideas. Can you share that part again?

Kellie

Yes, of course. "In conclusion, Valentine's Day in Japan is unique and meaningful. And giri choco is an important part of it. There is nothing wrong with the way Japanese people celebrate Valentine's Day. It's a wonderful Japanese tradition."

Momose

Thank you, Kellie. Then, can you give us your whole presentation one more time?

Kellie

Sure.

Kellie

Japanese Valentine's Day is unique. It's celebrated in an unusual way. I think it's good that Japan celebrates Valentine's Day in a different way than other countries. And there are two reasons why I think so.
First of all, it's an opportunity for women to express their love to men. This concept originated in Japan. And pretty much everyone in Japan knows how Valentine's Day works. It's a part of Japanese culture.
Second, Japanese Valentine's Day is meaningful. Giving chocolates is an expression of gratitude. In one survey in 2017, 450 women were asked if they were planning to hand out giri choco at their workplace. About 40 percent of them said yes. And among them, about 60 percent said it was a way of expressing their thanks to their coworkers. So there are a lot of women who think that giri choco can be a positive thing.
In conclusion, Valentine's Day in Japan is unique and meaningful. And giri choco is an important part of it. There is nothing wrong with the way Japanese people celebrate Valentine's Day. It's a wonderful Japanese tradition.

Momose

Thank you, Kellie. We'd like to ask you some questions.

Kellie

OK, sure.

Momose

Here is the first question. I understood that giri choco expresses gratitude, but aren't there other opportunities to tell people "thank you"?

Kellie

Yes, but Valentine's Day is the best day to do that. We don't tell people "thank you" every day. But on Valentine's Day, you can openly give giri choco to say "thank you."

Momose

Yeah, I agree. I have one more question. Based on the survey, you told us the two main reasons for giving giri choco. The first reason was to express gratitude, and the second reason was for better communication in the workplace. Were there any other reasons?

Kellie

Yes. Let me tell you an important reason. According to the survey, about 20 percent of the women giving giri choco said that giri choco would make a person happy.

Momose

Yes, I would be happy to get any gift. OK, thank you, Kellie. Shintaro, do you have any questions?

Shintaro

OK, my question is: Have you ever given giri choco?

Kellie

Actually, yes, I have. I've given giri choco to coworkers at the workplace. And they were very happy.

Dario

Hmm. Have you ever given a chocolate that's not giri?

Kellie

A chocolate that's not giri... Well, I do a lot of home baking, so I often make sweets for other people. So I guess so. Yes.

Dario

OK. OK.

Momose

Thank you, Dario. Thank you, Kellie. And thank you, Shintaro.

Momose

So how was today's lesson?

Shintaro

I think Kellie's presentation was very good.

Momose

Then, how do you feel about giri choco after hearing Kellie's presentation?

Shintaro

Of course, it was great presentation. So I'm still for giri choco.

Kellie

Oh, good! I'm so glad to hear that.

Momose

Dario, what did you think of Kellie's presentation?

Dario

Well, Kellie does point out some interesting points. And I know Shintaro is for giri choco at this point. But I know I can persuade him to be against it. Just wait until you hear my presentation, Shintaro.

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

OK. All right. Let's hear Dario's presentation tomorrow. That's all for today!

All

Bye!

DAY 4のスクリプト

Dario

Hi, everyone. Welcome back to "Learn English in English"! I'm Dario.

Kellie

Hi, I'm Kellie. Today is Day 4 of this program.

Shintaro

Hi, I'm Shintaro Terashima.

Momose

And I'm Miho Momose. I'm here to support you. Shintaro is our challenger in this program. We've been talking about this topic: Do we need giri choco for Valentine's Day?

Kellie

That's right. I gave my presentation yesterday. I'm for giri choco. I think it's nice to show one's gratitude by giving chocolates.

Dario

Well, I have a different opinion.

Momose

OK. So today, it's Dario's turn to give his presentation. What is the main point of your presentation?

Dario

The main point is: Giri choco is not an authentic way to celebrate Valentine's Day.

Momose

Shintaro, do you know the word "authentic"?

Shintaro

Oh, I don't know.

Momose

"Authentic" means "real."

Shintaro

Real? Oh, OK.

Momose

So, Dario, what do you mean by "not in an authentic way"?

Dario

Let me explain. Valentine's Day is a day for love, but giri choco is not about love.

Momose

OK.

Dario

Let me tell you how Valentine's Day started. There are many stories about this, but this is one of them. Valentinus was a person who worked for the church. He helped couples get married.

Momose

Mm, he was a nice man!

スクリプトをすべて見る

Dario

Yes. But in those days, some people weren't allowed to get married. And Valentinus helped them get married. So the leader of the Roman Empire got angry. As a result, Valentinus was caught and was killed on February 14th. Now we celebrate this day as Valentine's Day. So Valentine's Day is a day for love. It's strange that you give giri choco to people you don't love.

Momose

I see.

Dario

I have more information to support my opinion. On February 1st, 2018, a famous chocolate maker sent out a message in a Japanese newspaper.

Dario

The message said that Japan should stop giri choco.

Shintaro

Wow.

Dario

A famous chocolate company criticized Japanese culture in public!

Shintaro

Criticize?

Momose

Yeah, criticize. Kellie, could you explain?

Kellie

Sure. "Criticize" is to say what you don't like or what you think is wrong about something. So this company said to everyone that giri choco is not a good custom.

Shintaro

Hmm, OK.

Momose

Thank you, Kellie.

Dario

Thank you, Kellie.

Kellie

You're welcome.

Momose

Then, Dario, can you give us your presentation?

Dario

I'd be happy to.

Dario

In Japan, the true meaning of Valentine's Day has been lost. I'm against Japanese Valentine's Day for two main reasons.
First, the Japanese version of Valentine's Day is not authentic. Valentine's Day is supposed to be about love, not giri. Giri choco is often translated into English as "obligation chocolate" or "duty chocolate." It has nothing to do with love. In February 2018, a famous chocolate maker put out an ad in a major newspaper and openly criticized the custom of giri choco.
That brings me to my second reason: Japanese Valentine's Day is stressful. Some women feel that they have to give chocolates to all the male coworkers at their workplace. So they go out and buy so many chocolates. And it can be stressful for men, too. Men who receive chocolates on Valentine's Day have to give gifts in return on White Day. It's their turn to go out and buy gifts – not because they want to but because they have to.
In summary, Japanese Valentine's Day is stressful because of giri choco. Valentine's Day shouldn't be like that. It should be about love.

Momose

Thank you, Dario. Now, Shintaro, do you remember what he said about giri choco? He used some other words to express giri choco.

Shintaro

Oh... I don't.

Momose

OK, OK. Dario, can you tell us what you said?

Dario

Sure, no problem. "Giri choco is often translated into English as 'obligation chocolate' or 'duty chocolate.'" One more time. "Giri choco is often translated into English as 'obligation chocolate' or 'duty chocolate.'"

Shintaro

Hmm. Obligation or duty...?

Kellie

"Obligation" and "duty" have almost the same meaning. It means something that you feel you have to do because that's your responsibility.

Momose

"Responsibility." Could you explain?

Kellie

Sure. A responsibility is something that you have to do. For example, it is students' responsibility to study. You have to study for your tests at school.

Shintaro

Oh, I got it.

Momose

OK? Now let's check Dario's presentation from the beginning. First, Shintaro, how many reasons did Dario give to support his opinion?

Shintaro

He has two reasons.

Momose

Exactly. He gave two reasons. What was his first reason?

Shintaro

First? Hmm...

Momose

OK, let's ask Dario.

Shintaro

OK.

Dario

I said, "First, the Japanese version of Valentine's Day is not authentic. Valentine's Day is supposed to be about love, not giri." Let me repeat that. "First, the Japanese version of Valentine's Day is not authentic. Valentine's Day is supposed to be about love, not giri."

Momose

OK. Dario thinks that the Japanese style of celebrating Valentine's Day is not real. Then, what was his second reason?

Shintaro

Second reason is... um...

Momose

OK. Dario, can you say it again?

Dario

Sure. "Japanese Valentine's Day is stressful. Some women feel that they have to give chocolates to all the male coworkers at their workplace." One more time. "Japanese Valentine's Day is stressful. Some women feel that they have to give chocolates to all the male coworkers at their workplace."

Shintaro

So... second reason is Japanese Valentine's Day is stressful.

Momose

Great. Exactly. So, Dario, you said that men also feel stress. Can you tell us what you said one more time?

Dario

Sure. I said, "It can be stressful for men, too. Men who receive chocolates on Valentine's Day have to give gifts in return on White Day." Should I repeat that one more time?

Momose

Yes, please.

Dario

"It can be stressful for men, too. Men who receive chocolates on Valentine's Day have to give gifts in return on White Day."

Momose

Dario says that men have to prepare for White Day and that is very stressful. Shintaro, do you think this is true?

Shintaro

Um... I like shopping, so I don't feel stress about... buy gift. This is my opinion.

Momose

OK, so you don't feel stress on White day because you like shopping.

Shintaro

Yes.

Dario

Shintaro, I don't understand you! You have to feel stressed!

Shintaro

No, no, no, no...

Momose

OK, OK. Then, Dario, can you give us your presentation again?

Dario

All right!

Dario

In Japan, the true meaning of Valentine's Day has been lost. I'm against Japanese Valentine's Day for two main reasons.
First, the Japanese version of Valentine's Day is not authentic. Valentine's Day is supposed to be about love, not giri. giri choco is often translated into English as "obligation chocolate" or "duty chocolate." It has nothing to do with love. In February 2018, a famous chocolate maker put out an ad in a major newspaper and openly criticized the custom of giri choco.
That brings me to my second reason: Japanese Valentine's Day is stressful. Some women feel that they have to give chocolates to all the male coworkers at their workplace. So they go out and buy so many chocolates. And it can be stressful for men, too. Men who receive chocolates on Valentine's Day have to give gifts in return on White Day. It's their turn to go out and buy gifts ? not because they want to but because they have to.
In summary, Japanese Valentine's Day is stressful because of giri choco. Valentine's Day shouldn't be like that. It should be about love.

Momose

Thank you, Dario. Now let me ask several questions about your presentation, OK?

Dario

No problem!

Momose

First, you told us that Valentine's Day is not real, but why does it have to be authentic?

Dario

Hmm, good point. If you call it "Valentine's Day," you should celebrate it in the original way ? as a day for love. Valentine's Day in Japan is just "Chocolate Day"!

Momose

What do you think about it, Shintaro?

Shintaro

"Chocolate Day" is good!

Momose

OK.

Shintaro

Yeah.

Momose

Then, shall we change the name?

Shintaro

Yeah!

Momose

OK, OK... Then, I have another question. Valentine's Day is not a holiday; it's just an event for fun. Can't you just ignore it? You don't need to do anything.

Dario

Yes, I understand, but a lot of people feel that they have to do something on Valentine's Day. Actually, there was a survey taken in 2018. 252 women answered.

Momose

What did the survey say?

Dario

It said that about 25 percent of the women gave chocolates to coworkers because the men were waiting for chocolates. This shows that giri choco puts pressure on women.

Momose

Mm, I used to be one of those women!

Dario

Uh-oh.

Momose

One more quick question. How would you feel if you received giri choco?

Dario

Well, I would thank the person, but I would be thinking in my mind, "Oh, you don't have to do this."

Momose

Uh-huh. OK, thank you, Dario. That's all for my questions.

Momose

So, Shintaro, how was today's lesson?

Shintaro

It was really interesting and fun. And I think "Chocolate Day" is good.

Momose

Kellie, what did you think of Dario's presentation?

Kellie

Well, I learned a lot about the negative sides of giri choco.

Momose

All right. Let's ask Shintaro's opinion tomorrow. Shintaro, be prepared!

Shintaro

OK. I'll do my best tomorrow. Please look forward to it.

Momose

OK, everyone, that's it for today!

All

Bye!

DAY 5のスクリプト

Dario

Hi, everyone. I'm Dario. Welcome back to "Learn English in English"!

Kellie

Hi, there. I'm Kellie. Thank you for joining us.

Shintaro

Hi, I'm Shintaro Terashima. I will give a presentation today.

Momose

I'm Miho Momose. Great to have everyone with us.

Kellie

We've been discussing one topic all week. Shintaro, what is the topic?

Shintaro

Japanese Valentine's Day, giri choco.

Kellie

Great! The topic is: Do we need giri choco on Valentine's Day?

Dario

Kellie is for giri choco, and I am against it.

Momose

That's right. Today is the last day, and we are going to ask Shintaro if he is for or against giri choco. Are you ready?

Shintaro

Yes, I am!

Dario

OK!

Momose

But before we go into that, we'd like to talk a little about English grammar. Japanese learners sometimes don't use the subject correctly. For example, when you want to say, 「チョコが好き」, some people say, "Chocolates like." But that's not correct. You should say…

Dario

"I like chocolates."
"I like chocolates."

Momose

So let's talk about the subject in a sentence.

Kellie

OK. Let me start with an example sentence: "I make chocolates."
"I make chocolates." In this sentence, "I" is the subject.

スクリプトをすべて見る

Dario

To make a sentence, you need to choose the subject. In the sentence "I make chocolates," "I" is the person who makes chocolates.

Momose

So the subject is someone that does something. Let's look at the subjects in different sentences.

Kellie

"My brother wants to buy a box of chocolates."
"My brother wants to buy a box of chocolates." Shintaro, what is the subject in this sentence?

Shintaro

"My brother" is the subject.

Momose

Yes, great. "My brother" is the person who wants to buy chocolates. Now let's move on to the next step.

Kellie

OK. You can put not only a person but also a place, thing, or idea as a subject. Try to find the subject in the following sentences.

Dario

"Tokyo has many spots to see."
"Tokyo has many spots to see."

Momose

Shintaro, what is the subject?

Shintaro

The subject is "Tokyo."

Momose

Great. "Tokyo" is the place that has many spots to see. How about this?

Kellie

"His words surprised me."
"His words surprised me."

Shintaro

OK. The subject is "his word."

Kellie

That's right! The subject is "his words." "His words" is the thing that surprised me.

Dario

You can also say, "I was surprised at his words."
"I was surprised at his words." In this sentence, "I" is the subject. These two sentences almost have the same meaning, but the subjects are different.

Kellie

Like in these sentences, the subject is usually placed at the beginning.

Momose

Mm, but sometimes it is not placed at the beginning. Listen to this.

Dario

"Tomorrow, I will meet her."
"Tomorrow, I will meet her."

Momose

OK, Shintaro, what is the subject in this sentence?

Shintaro

The subject is "I."

Momose

Good! The point is "who or what" will meet her tomorrow. So here is the last question for Shintaro and the listeners. What is the subject in this next sentence?

Kellie

"In other words, reading books helps you learn new vocabulary."
"In other words, reading books helps you learn new vocabulary."

Dario

Wow, this is a tough one. Shintaro, are you going to be OK?

Shintaro

OK. "Reading books" is the subject.

Momose

Great! How did you know that?

Shintaro

This is just... inspiration.

Dario

Well, anyway...

Dario & Kellie

Good job!

Shintaro

Thank you.

Momose

The subject is very important. When you speak, make sure you know what the subject is. That's the key to making an English sentence.

Momose

All right. Now let's go back to the discussion. Kellie and Dario, could you briefly summarize your presentations, please?

Kellie

Sure. I think it's wonderful that Japan celebrates Valentine's Day in a unique way. And I feel that giri choco is an important part of it. I like that Valentine's Day is not only a day for love, but a day to show your appreciation as well. That's why I'm for giri choco.

Dario

And here's what I said. Valentine's Day is a day for love, but giri choco has nothing to do with love. Also, this custom can cause stress to both women and men. I feel that the true meaning of Valentine's Day in Japan is lost because of giri choco. That's why I'm against it.

Momose

Thank you. Now Shintaro needs to make a decision. So have you made up your mind?

Shintaro

Yes!

Momose

OK. But before you tell everyone, why don't we practice, just you and me?

Shintaro

Yes!

Momose

Welcome to Momose's room!

Momose

OK, Shintaro, let's practice saying your opinion. Are you ready?

Shintaro

Yes, I'm ready.

Momose

OK, go ahead.

Shintaro

OK. I'm for giri choco. Dario said Japanese Valentine's Day is not authentic, but I think it's OK. Giri choco is Japanese own original custom. I don't have a girlfriend, so if Japan hasn't giri choco custom...

Momose

OK. "If Japan doesn't have..."

Shintaro

"Doesn't have..." OK. If Japan doesn't have giri choco custom, I cannot get any chocolates on Valentine's Day. So I hope that giri choco custom continue.

Momose

Ah, Shintaro, your presentation was great! But let me help you make it better.

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

OK? First, your opinion, the most important part, is for or against?

Shintaro

I'm for giri choco.

Momose

OK, you are for giri choco. Then, how many reasons do you have?

Shintaro

Two?

Momose

Yeah, two reasons, right?

Shintaro

Yes. Yeah.

Momose

OK. So, first, you say your opinion. Next, you say your reasons.

Shintaro

Reasons.

Momose

You have two reasons, so you can say, "I have two reasons. First, blah, blah, blah. Second, blah, blah, blah."

Shintaro

Oh.

Momose

OK?

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

Then, in the end, please repeat your opinion again as a conclusion. OK?

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

So begin the sentence in this way: "In conclusion..."

Shintaro

"In conclusion..."

Momose

"I am for giri choco."

Shintaro

"I am for giri choco."

Momose

OK?

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

So let's start your presentation from the beginning.

Shintaro

OK.

Momose

First, your opinion is...?

Shintaro

I'm for giri choco.

Momose

Then, how many reasons do you have?

Shintaro

I have two reasons.

Momose

OK. First?

Shintaro

First, Dario said Japanese Valentine's Day is not authentic, but I think it's OK. giri choco is Japanese own original custom.

Momose

Then, second reason. "Second..."

Shintaro

Second, I don't have a girlfriend, so if Japan doesn't have giri choco custom, I cannot get any chocolates.

Momose

Good, good! I can't stop smiling about your second reason. But anyway, let's go to the last part. "In conclusion..."

Shintaro

In conclusion...

Momose

"I am..."

Shintaro

I am for giri choco. So I hope that giri choco custom continue.

Momose

Let's say, "I hope that giri choco custom will continue."

Shintaro

I hope that giri choco custom will continue.

Momose

Great! You got it?

Shintaro

Yeah, I got it!

Momose

Kellie! Dario! We're ready.

Dario

OK!

Momose

You can come in.

Dario

Oh!

Kellie

Great! I'm excited!

Dario

We are back! How did it go?

Momose

It went very well! So Shintaro has made up his mind. He's going to tell us if he is for or against giri choco. Shintaro, are you ready?

Shintaro

Yes, I'm ready.

Momose

OK, good. So, Shintaro, tell us your answer.

Shintaro

I'm for giri choco!

Dario

Oh, no! Why?!

Kellie

Oh, great! I'm so glad!

Dario

Why?!

Kellie

I knew it!

Momose

OK. Now, Shintaro, please give your presentation from the beginning.

Shintaro

OK.
I'm for giri choco. I have two reasons.
First, Dario said Japanese Valentine's Day is not authentic, but I think it's OK. giri choco is Japanese own original custom.
Second, I don't have a girlfriend, so if Japan doesn't have giri choco custom, I cannot get any chocolates on Valentine's Day.
In conclusion, I am for giri choco. I hope that giri choco custom will continue.
Thank you.

Dario

Yeah, great presentation!

Kellie

That was a really good presentation.

Dario

Yeah.

Shintaro

Thank you!

Dario

Very good, Shintaro. There is one point I would like to point out to make your presentation better. You said, "giri choco custom," but it's "the giri choco custom."

Shintaro

Oh, "the giri choco custom."

Dario

Right.

Shintaro

OK.

Dario

All right!

Momose

Shintaro, you did a great job!

Shintaro

Thank you!

Momose

It was amazing!

Momose

So this is the end of our program. How was it, Shintaro?

Shintaro

Hmm, it was very interesting, and I think my presentation was... good?

Momose

Yeah, it was good!

Shintaro

Thank you.

Momose

It was very good.

Shintaro

It was fun.

Momose

OK. Then, how about you, Kellie?

Kellie

Yes, I really enjoyed Shintaro's presentation. And of course, I was happy that Shintaro was for giri choco, but it was also really interesting to hear other opinions.

Momose

Mm. And you, Dario?

Dario

Well, I thought this English-only radio program was very interesting and very unique. I really hope everyone enjoyed the program as much as I did.

Momose

Yes, I agree with you, Dario. This program was very unique and very effective for English learners, especially Japanese students. I know there are a lot of students who want to be a good English speaker. If you want to be a better speaker, just try speaking it. Don't be afraid of making mistakes. Just try!

Kellie

Yes, I totally agree.

Dario

I do, too. You need to speak to learn.

Momose

Shintaro, do you think so?

Shintaro

Yes, I think so!

Momose

OK, everyone, thank you so much for joining us.

All

Bye!

感想を書く(ご意見・ご要望)

番組を聴いて、勉強になったこと、分かりづらかったこと、こんなところが良かった、もっとこうだったら良いなというご意見やご要望を教えてください。今後の番組作りの参考にさせて頂きます。

ぜひ教えて頂きたいポイント
英語を話すスピードはどうでしたか?
番組の中でわからない表現が出てきましたか?もし、そうだった場合、それは番組の中で解決されましたか?
出演者はいかがでしたか?
「義理チョコは必要かどうか」というテーマはどうでしたか?

出演者

リスナーのみなさんへ  英語を英語で学ぶ体験をしてみましょう!
 英語で聞いた内容を日本語に訳さずに理解し、自分の考えなどを英語で思い浮かべて英語で話すというトレーニングを積んでおくことが、「英語を使える力」を向上させるのに役立ちます。
 もし日本語を介して理解し発言していたら、考えをまとめて発言するまでに時間がかかるばかりか、英語の文構造が日本語の発想に影響され、直訳調で分かりづらくなる可能性があります。
 そして英語を英語で学んでいると、「たぶんこういう意味だろう」「この表現ではおかしいな」「こんなふうにシンプルに言えるな」などと思いつくようになる「英語のセンス」も磨けます。
 では、ご一緒にはじめましょう!

監修:松本茂
監修 松本 茂
立教大学経営学部国際経営学科教授(バイリンガル・ビジネスリーダー・プログラム主査)、同大学グローバル教育センター長。専門はコミュニケーション教育学。Eテレ「おとなの基礎英語」の講師を6シーズン務めた。全国高校英語ディベート連盟副理事長、日本ディベート協会専務理事、一般財団法人日本英語教育協議会評議員なども務めている。

リスナーのみなさんへ  英語を使いながら表現を身につけていくことができるような時代になりました。教室にも日々の生活にも英語を使う場面があふれています。
「使いたいから学びたい」、「学んだ表現を使いたい」のサイクルをみつけてください。

講師:百瀬 美帆
講師 百瀬 美帆
明海大学教職課程センター地域学校教育センター准教授。専門はコミュニケーション活動を中心としたオールイングリッシュによる英語指導法。長年、高校で英語で英語の授業を教えてきた経験を持つ。教師としての信条は "You can be whatever you want to be."
パートナー:Kellie Holway
パートナー Kellie Holway ケリー・ホールウェイ
アメリカ・マサチューセッツ州出身。フラッグラー大学(フロリダ州)にて舞台芸術を学ぶ。卒業後はディズニーやブロードウェイのパフォーマーとして活躍し、数々の舞台や映画に出演。日本では主にESL英語講師として、子供から大人まで幅広い年齢層への英語指導や教育用ナレーションに携わる。趣味は映画製作や写真撮影、旅行、キャンプ、料理など。
パートナー:Dario Toda
パートナー Dario Toda ダリオ戸田
東京都出身。俳優・歌手・ナレーターとして、多方面で活躍中。日本語、英語、イタリア語で話して歌うマルチ・パフォーマー。執筆業もこなす。主な語学系番組の出演は、「100語でスタート!英会話」(コーパス君役)、「新感覚☆キーワードで英会話」、「新感覚☆わかる使える英文法」(以上、NHKEテレ)、「セサミストリート」(テレビ東京)、「はなまるマーケット(キャイ~ングリッシュ)」(TBS)ほか。趣味は、映画鑑賞、ギター、読書など。
挑戦者:寺嶋 慎太朗
挑戦者 寺嶋 慎太朗
東京都出身。特技はバク転とルービックキューブ。4歳から英語を習い始め、現在再放送中の「基礎英語0 ~世界エイゴミッション」(Eテレ)にも出演。そのほかの出演作品は、ドラマ「金曜ロードSHOW!特別ドラマ企画 がっぱ先生!」(NTV)、「WOWOW 連続ドラマW アキラとあきら」(WOWOW)、「俺のスカート、どこ行った?」(NTV)など。

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